Moruya Books

Day Dreaming

 

Feel like Day Dreaming?

We’ve got a great range of titles exploring our great Australian landscape.

Get lost in the intersections between Indigenous and White Australian experience.

Position Doubtful by Kim Mahood

Imagine the document you have before you is not a book but a map. It is well-used, creased, and folded, so that when you open it, no matter how carefully, something tears and a line that is neither latitude nor longitude opens in the hidden geography of the place you are about to enter.

Since the publication of her prize-winning memoir, Craft for a Dry Lake, in 2000, writer and artist Kim Mahood has been returning to the Tanami desert country in far north-western Australia where, as a child, she lived with her family on a remote cattle station. The land is timeless, but much has changed: the station has been handed back to its traditional owners; the mining companies have arrived; and Aboriginal art has flourished.

Comedy and tragedy, familiarity and uncertainty are Mahood’s constant companions as she immerses herself in the life of a small community and in groundbreaking mapping projects. What emerges in Position Doubtful is a revelation of the significance of the land to its people — and of the burden of history.

Mahood is an artist of astonishing versatility. She works with words, with paint, with installations, and with performance art. Her writing about her own work and collaborations, and about the work of the desert artists, is profoundly enlightening, making palpable the link between artist and country.

This is a beautiful and intense exploration of friendships, landscape, and homecoming. Written with great energy and humour, Position Doubtful offers a unique portrait of the complexities of black and white relations in contemporary Australia.

Kim Mahood

 

Songlines: Tracking the Seven Sisters 

A Catalogue to compliment a magnificent exhibition on in Canberra’s National Museum of Australia.

Songlines explores the history and meaning of songlines, the Dreaming or creation tracks that crisscross the Australian continent, of which the Seven Sisters songline is one of the most extensive.
Through stunning artworks (many created especially for the exhibition), story, and in-depth analysis, the book will provide the definitive resource for those interested in finding out more about these complex pathways of spiritual, ecological, economic, cultural, and ontological knowledge — the stories ‘written in the land’.

 

 

Yiwarra Kuju: The Canning Stock Route 

Yiwarra Kuju: The Canning Stock Route – is (another!) catalogue published by the National Museum of Australia to accompany the groundbreaking exhibition of the same name. The book features essays by co-curators Carly Davenport, Monique La Fontaine and John Carty.

Yiwarra Kuju includes beautiful plates of the complete Canning Stock Route Collection and tells the story of the stock route’s impact, and the importance of the country around it, in Aboriginal voices and interpreted through Aboriginal eyes. It is a story of contact, conflict and survival, of exodus and return. Above all, it is a story of family, culture and Country.

 

 

Songlines & Fault Lines by Glenn Morrison

Visitors to the Red Centre come looking for the real Australia, but find a place both beautiful and disturbing. There is wilderness, desire and an Aboriginal philosophy of home. But there is also the confusing countenance of the Australian frontier, a meeting place between black and white, ancient and modern.

Songlines and Fault Lines explores the Red Centre through the eyes of those who have walked it, in six remarkable stories that have shaped our nation. It follows Aboriginal Dreamtime Ancestors along a songline, trudges with John McDouall Stuart as he crosses the continent, and walks the Finke River in the footsteps of anthropologist T.G.H. Strehlow. It keeps pace with conservationist Arthur Groom as he reimagines the country’s heart as tourist playground, ponders a philosophy of walking with British travel writer Bruce Chatwin, and then strolls the grog-troubled streets of Alice Springs with Eleanor Hogan.

Retracing time-worn pathways and stories of Australia’s centre, Glenn Morrison finds fresh answers to age-old queries.

 

Glenn Morrison

and last but not least….

Dark Emu by Bruce Pascoe

Dark Emu argues for a reconsideration of the ‘hunter-gatherer’ tag for pre-colonial Aboriginal Australians and attempts to rebut the colonial myths that have worked to justify dispossession. Accomplished author Bruce Pascoe provides compelling evidence from the diaries of early explorers that suggests that systems of food production and land management have been blatantly understated in modern retellings of early Aboriginal history, and that a new look at Australia’s past is required.

WINNER – Book of the Year in the 2016 NSW Premier’s Literary Awards

WINNER – Indigenous Writer’s Prize in the 2016 NSW Premier’s Literary Awards

 

Bruce Pascoe

 

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